DYSFUNCTIONAL ROBOTS HAVE FEELINGS TOO

NOVEMBER 1 – 23, 2019
OPENING FRIDAY NOVEMBER 1, 5-7 PM

A multimedia installation with motion and audio lead by Daniel Eastman

Team Members
Jill Strapp; Peggy Fothergill; Roger Harper; Daniel Austin; Bessie Bartlett; Vicki Hogarth; Maurice Basque; Lee Heenan

About the Exhibition

“I am intrigued with the concept of possible interactions between art and the viewer.  The performing arts always have some spontaneous dialogue. It may be as subdued as a polite acknowledgement with applause or it can be dramatic audience participation that plays a key role in shaping the artistic performance. But visual art is often an unspoken monologue within the viewer.  Particularly in three dimensional figurative art  the viewer becomes a voyeur.  And violates the personal space of the art.

I am attempting to  offer an alternative where the visual art has the ability to interact with the viewer so that both art and viewer can acknowledge the presence of the other.  I am experimenting with different modes of interaction that art may use that loosely falls within kinetic art.  I am assembling a group of figures,  not shaped to be necessarily anthropomorphic but given the ability to sense, to wander, to find, to confront and to speak to the human viewer.   They are equipped with sensors, motors and speakers and will by their body language and voice have an array of comments to make about the viewer.  They will be costumed, mobile and self controlled though so their fabrication uses an array of electromechanical materials and devices hopefully concealed so the pure art viewer is not offended or overwhelmed with a little technology.”   –  D.Eastman

“The Walls Between Art and Technology Exist Only in Our Minds” – Theo Jansen

“If it functions it is just art, but if it is dysfunctional it is high art.” – Robert Peden

About the Artist

After a career in teaching and optical design Daniel Eastman enrolled in the Ontario Collage of Art and Design. After graduation in 2011 with a degree in sculpture and installation, he chose St Andrews as the place the build his first studio and pursue various dreams. St Andrews has been a golden opportunity to work with a group of stone carvers and help to form a mot supportive community.

Playing with kinetic art is one of his dream activities. He has always been confounded by the inner asymmetric monologue that occurs when a person examines a stone figure. The human unconsciously takes the role of voyeur and invades the personal space of the sculpture now has an opportunity to comment on the human condition. His anthropomorphic form are designed to capture the monumental glance of a human to allow the form to comment on some aspect of trance the human may not see.