Smudging and Incense: Crafting with Wild Plants – Maria Recchia

$35.00

Instructed by Maria Recchia

Saturday, October 1, 1:00 – 4:00 pm

Adult / Youth 14+

While learning about native and wild plants that grow in this area,  we will forage for plants and grasses useful in smudge and incense making. Plants that grow in fields, the forest, and along the seashore will be identified, and how many of them have been used in the Western (i.e. European) herbal perspective. (See full description below…)

Registration Deadline: September 29, 2022

Materials Required by students: If students wish, they may bring in wild and native plants and grasses.

 

In stock

SKU: CA-2022-29 Category:

Description

While learning about native and wild plants that grow in this area,  we will forage for plants and grasses useful in smudge and incense making. Plants that grow in fields, the forest, and along the seashore will be identified, and how many of them have been used in the Western (i.e. European) herbal perspective.  There will be some discussion also about local native plants.  After foraging, we will work in the studio to create smudge sticks and/or incense. A history of using fragrant smoke for energetic cleansing, blessing, protection, relaxation, dreamwork, etc will be presented. We will also address how to avoid appropriation from Indigenous cultures while still enjoying the use of incense and smudges.

About the Instructor:

Maria has been a student of herbalism and a great lover of plants for as long as she can remember. From an Italian-American family, she has a keen interest in the use of herbs for
healing and spiritual practice from the southern European traditions. She is an animist, believing that all elements of nature have Spirit, including plants. As a settler in this beautiful place, she is seeking a reciprocal relationship of respect with this land and the Indigenous people whose homeland it is. Maria uses primarily naturalized European plants in her practice of medical and spiritual herbalism, to both honours her ancestry and preserve the many native plants that have become rare since colonialization. She is involved in public celebrations of the wheel of the year holidays (solstices, equinoxes and cross-quarter days). She works to connect people physically and spiritually to Nature in all her forms.